Vegetables That Start With F

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We agree that it isn’t always easy to think of loads of vegetables starting with the letter F. However, our list is “fab”, “fresh”, “fancy” and “full” of ideas. We have thought long and hard and come up with some worthy suggestions that will ensure a few vegetables should become firmly fixed in your mind.

You might be lucky to know 50% of these vegetables.

vegetables starting with f

Vegetables That Start With The Letter F

1. French Sorrel

Sorrel is a herb that is heavily laden with citrus notes. French sorrel is particularly ‘tart’ with a slightly bitter taste. It has more of a fruity taste than regular sorrel with an acidic sharpness. The closest thing we can think of to describe this is something akin to fresh rhubarb. If you are looking for an inexhaustible supply, French Sorrel is extremely easy to grow and, once it takes root, you may have problems actually keeping it at bay.

2. Fennel

Fennel is wonderfully dynamic as it can be used as an herbal additive or eaten wholesale as a vegetable. Fennel comes as a large ‘head’ which is sort of a cross between celery and Pak choi. When braised or slowly baked it takes on a sweetness with hints of aniseed and is an ideal accompaniment to foods high in fat such as pork. The tips of fennel can be finely shredded and used raw as an eye-catching garnish, and if you encounter Fennel Seeds, these can be ground or added whole to dishes to give more depth. Use Fennel seeds sparingly as they are very strong.  

3. Fiddlehead Fern

This is a super interesting plant, that secretly masquerades as a vegetable. Fiddlehead ferns are the curled tops of specific breeds of young ferns, that must be harvested prior to them uncurling. If you find them in the right season they can be cooked much in the same way as spinach or asparagus, which is convenient as they taste like a cross between the two, with an earthy nutty taste lingering in the background.

4. Falberry

Falberry is of the vaccinium species of berries and tastes very similar, other family members include blueberries, cranberries and lingonberries. It has a sharp slightly metallic taste which tends to settle down when they are cooked. If stewed with sugar and allowed to cool it can also make a nice preserve.

5. Feijoa

Feijoa originally came from South America, but has emigrated across the Pacific to become pretty popular in both Australia and New Zealand. When raw, this green fruit has a similar texture to common pears. The flavor profile of this delicate little fruit tastes like a mix of pineapple and strawberry with perhaps a hint of tropical guava thrown in for good measure.

6. Fenugreek

Fenugreek is herb that features predominantly in food that most would call spicy. Whether you are making an Indian dish or something from South America such as a Chili Beef, Fenugreek can add subtle hints of sweet and nutty flavor that taste almost like overcooked sugar.

7. Fig

Figs are one of the oldest fruits known to mankind and feature worldwide as a healthy source of vitamins and minerals. Figs are at their best when they are ripe and are super sweet. They tend to ripen quickly so it is common practice that they are preserved by drying them. The flesh of the fig and the crunchy seeds inside are edible.

8. Frisee Greens

Frisee greens are a sort of lettuce, but with a stronger flavor. Coming from the chicory family their appearance is similar to rocket leaves, but lighter in color. The taste is quite bitter, but as with any bitter leaf, it can act as a worthy accompaniment to dishes which are quite rich such as duck breast or lamb fillets.

9. Fingerlime

Ok the fingerlime is a seriously weird (and delicious) fruit. The outside looks like a kind of pickle, but don’t be fooled. Once you split the skin the inside is packed with little bubbles of goodness that taste just like, you guessed it, tangy and citrusy lime. If you want to pep a dish up with something that will generally surprise your guests, use this fruit in place of lime.

10. Finocchio

Ok well we might have cheated a bit with this one. The reason for this being that it is in fact another name for Fennel. So, if you want to know about it read the section above. If you want to pronounce it, it is said in exactly the same way as the name of the Disney puppet ‘Pinocchio’.

11. Frangipane (edible flower)

Frangipane edible flowers are from the Plumeria family of plants. They look very similar to the propellors that you would find underneath a boat, and come in a range of colors. The flavor is very delicate and slightly peppery. Generally, they are used more often to create a bit of variety and interest on plate and to add a splash of unobtrusive color.

12. French bean

Whilst called French beans, you might have heard them referred to as ‘green beans’. They are one and the same thing. They can be served finely chopped and raw in a salad, or if you prefer them cooked steam them until they are just cooked. The make an ideal filler in soups and stews and also feature very heavily in Asian cooking. With French beans it is a good idea to avoid overcooking as the texture turns very soft.

13. Fava bean

Bottles of Chianti at the ready? Fava beans are a great source of vitamins, including vitamin C and Iron. They have a long pod which, once split, reveals a bright green treasure within. They can be eaten raw as a snack, or alternatively shelled and cooked.

Conclusion

Well there we are, lots of ideas for vegetables starting with the letter F. Hopefully you’ll be able to source some of the more common ones, and then you can find your favorites.

Let us know others we may have missed on this list.

vegetables that start with the letter f

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