Chow Mein vs Lo Mein: Unraveling the Differences

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When it comes to Chinese cuisine, two noodle dishes stand out – Chow Mein and Lo Mein. While they might seem similar at first glance, there are distinct differences between these two delicious dishes. In this guide, we’ll delve into the intricacies of Chow Mein vs Lo Mein, exploring everything from their origins to their ingredients, preparation methods, and variations.

Chow Mein and Lo Mein both use noodles and stir-fry techniques but differ in noodle type and flavor profiles. Chow Mein uses wide, flat noodles and has a savory, slightly smoky flavor from soy sauce and seared noodles, while Lo Mein uses thin vermicelli and curry powder, providing a spicy, aromatic taste. Chow Mein usually has more calories due to larger portions.

chow mein vs lo mein difference

What is Chow Mein?

Chow Mein, also known as Ho Fun, is a staple dish in Southern China, particularly in Guangdong province. This dish is steeped in history, tracing its roots back to the Qing Dynasty. At its core, Chow Mein is a stir-fried noodle dish featuring broad and flat rice noodles as its main ingredient. These noodles are usually stir-fried with a protein (beef is a popular choice), bean sprouts, scallions, and dark soy sauce.

Depending on the region or personal preference, variations of Chow Mein exist. Some may include different vegetables or proteins, while others may prefer it ‘dry-fried’ (without sauce) or ‘wet’ (with sauce).

How to Make Chow Mein

  1. Prepare the noodles: Cook the noodles according to the package instructions until they are al dente. Drain and set them aside.
  2. Prepare the sauce: In a small bowl, mix together soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil.
  3. Stir-fry the ingredients: Heat oil in a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Add your choice of protein (like chicken, beef, or tofu) and stir-fry until it’s cooked through. Remove the protein and set it aside.
  4. Cook the vegetables: In the same wok, add more oil if needed, then add vegetables such as shredded cabbage, bell peppers, and bean sprouts. Stir-fry until they are tender.
  5. Combine everything: Add the cooked noodles and protein back into the wok with the vegetables. Pour over the sauce and toss everything together until the noodles are heated through and all the ingredients are well combined.
  6. Serve: Dish out the Chow Mein into plates or bowls, garnish with green onions or sesame seeds if desired, and serve hot.

Remember, Chow Mein is a versatile dish, feel free to experiment with different types of protein and vegetables according to your preference.

See Also: Chow Fun vs Mei Fun

What is Lo Mein?

Lo Mein, also known as Rice Vermicelli or Singapore Noodles, unlike Chow Mein, features thin rice vermicelli noodles. Originating from Fujian province in China, Lo Mein is a versatile dish that has gained popularity across Southeast Asia and beyond.

The ingredients for Lo Mein typically include thin rice noodles stir-fried with a variety of vegetables and proteins (like shrimp or chicken) and seasoned with curry powder for that distinctive taste. Just like Chow Mein, Lo Mein also has regional variations; some versions include different sauces or additional ingredients.

How to Make Lo Mein

  1. Prepare the noodles: Cook the Lo Mein noodles according to the package instructions until they are al dente. Drain and set them aside.
  2. Prepare the sauce: In a small bowl, mix together soy sauce, oyster sauce, sesame oil, and a bit of sugar.
  3. Stir-fry the ingredients: Heat some oil in a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Add your choice of protein (like chicken, beef, or tofu) and stir-fry until it’s cooked through. Then remove the protein and set it aside.
  4. Cook the vegetables: In the same wok, add more oil if needed, then add vegetables such as bok choy, mushrooms, or bell peppers. Stir-fry until they are tender.
  5. Combine everything: Add the cooked noodles and protein back into the wok with the vegetables. Pour over the sauce and toss everything together until the noodles are well coated and heated through.
  6. Serve: Dish out the Lo Mein into plates or bowls, garnish with green onions or sesame seeds if desired, and serve hot.

Just like Chow Mein, Lo Mein is also highly versatile, and you can use any combination of vegetables and proteins according to your liking. The key to a great Lo Mein is in the sauce and the quick, high-heat stir-frying method.

Differences between Chow Mein and Lo Mein

AspectChow MeinLo Mein
NoodlesCrispy, fried egg noodlesSoft, boiled or steamed egg noodles
TextureCrispy and crunchySoft and tender
Cooking MethodStir-fried with high heatTossed with sauce and ingredients
SauceLighter sauce, mostly soy-based or savoryHeavier sauce, often thickened with cornstarch
IngredientsTypically includes vegetables, meat, and seafoodOften includes vegetables and choice of meat
Absorption of SauceNoodles remain relatively dry, sauce on topNoodles fully coated with sauce and ingredients
Regional VariationsVaries by region and cultureVaries by region and culture
Culinary ImportancePopular in Chinese-American cuisinePopular in Chinese-American cuisine
AvailabilityFound in Chinese restaurants and takeout menusFound in Chinese restaurants and takeout menus
Serving StyleOften served as a main dishOften served as a main dish
Preparation TimeQuick cooking time due to pre-fried noodlesMay take a bit longer to prepare from scratch
FlavorNoodles are the prominent flavorIngredients and sauce contribute to the flavor
Common AdditionsCommonly added with bean sprouts and green onionsOften paired with eggs and a variety of vegetables
Dietary ConsiderationsNot gluten-free due to wheat-based noodlesMay have gluten-free options using rice noodles
Popular VarietiesChicken Chow Mein, Shrimp Chow Mein, Vegetable Chow MeinChicken Lo Mein, Shrimp Lo Mein, Beef Lo Mein
Chinese Name炒面 (Chǎo Miàn)捞面 (Lāo Miàn)

While both dishes feature rice noodles and a stir-fry method of preparation, they have significant differences. Chow Mein uses wide flat noodles compared to the thin vermicelli in Lo Mein. The flavor profiles also differ; Chow Mein’s taste is primarily determined by the soy sauce and seared noodles, giving it a savory and slightly smoky flavor. Conversely, Lo Mein gets its unique flavor from curry powder, which imparts a spicy and aromatic taste.

Nutritionally speaking, both dishes provide carbohydrates from the noodles and protein from the meat used. However, Chow Mein’s wider noodles often mean larger portions and more calories compared to the lighter Lo Mein.

The Origins of Chow Mein and Lo Mein

Chow Mein

Chow Mein originated from the northern regions of China. The term ‘Chow Mein’ translates to ‘stir-fried noodles’. This dish is characterized by its use of wheat noodles, which are stir-fried until they become crispy and brown.

Lo Mein

On the other hand, Lo Mein is a dish with roots in Cantonese cuisine, specifically from the Guangdong province. ‘Lo Mein’ translates to ‘tossed noodles’, and unlike Chow Mein, the noodles in this dish are boiled until they become soft and chewy.

The Noodles: Chow Mein vs Lo Mein

The main difference between Chow Mein and Lo Mein lies in the type of noodles used and how they are prepared.

Chow Mein Noodles

Chow Mein uses either thin or thick wheat noodles. These noodles are parboiled, then added to the wok to be stir-fried with other ingredients until they become crispy.

Lo Mein Noodles

Lo Mein uses egg noodles which are boiled to softness. These soft, egg noodles are then mixed with stir-fried ingredients in the wok but are not fried themselves, resulting in a softer texture compared to Chow Mein.

Key Ingredients and Flavors

Chow Mein

Chow Mein is known for its savory and slightly smoky flavor, achieved by stir-frying noodles to a crisp texture. Common ingredients include vegetables such as cabbage, bell peppers, and bean sprouts, and proteins like chicken, beef, or shrimp. The dish is often seasoned with soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil.

Lo Mein

Lo Mein, in contrast, has a softer, more supple texture, with the noodles absorbing the flavors of the sauce and other ingredients. Ingredients can include bok choy, mushrooms, and a variety of proteins. The sauce typically consists of soy sauce, hoisin sauce, and sesame oil.

Cooking Methods: Stir-Frying vs Tossing

Cooking Chow Mein

Chow Mein noodles are first parboiled and then added to a wok or frying pan where they are stir-fried to a crispy texture. Then, the cooked proteins and vegetables are added, along with the sauces and seasonings.

Cooking Lo Mein

For Lo Mein, the egg noodles are fully cooked in boiling water then drained. The vegetables and proteins are stir-fried separately, and the cooked noodles are added at the end. The dish is then tossed until everything is well mixed and the noodles are fully coated in the sauce.

Variations of Chow Mein and Lo Mein

There are countless variations of both Chow Mein and Lo Mein, influenced by regional tastes and personal preferences.

Chow Mein Variations

Chow Mein variations can include Hong Kong Style Chow Mein, which features a bed of crispy noodles topped with a thick sauce, or Crispy Chow Mein, where the noodles are fried until they’re extra crispy.

Lo Mein Variations

On the other hand, variations of Lo Mein may include Seafood Lo Mein, Vegetable Lo Mein, or ‘House’ Lo Mein, which usually features a mix of different proteins.

Health Aspects

The healthiness of either Chow Mein or Lo Mein depends largely on the ingredients used and the cooking method. Generally, both dishes can be part of a balanced diet when enjoyed in moderation and prepared with lots of vegetables and lean proteins. However, it’s important to note that they can be high in sodium due to the sauces used.

See Also: Tobiko vs Masago

Conclusion

Both Chow Mein and Lo Mein offer a delightful culinary experience, each with their own unique textures and flavors. Whether you prefer the crispy, savory bites of Chow Mein or the soft, saucy strands of Lo Mein, there’s a noodle dish to satisfy your cravings. Understanding the differences between Chow Mein vs Lo Mein can enhance your appreciation of these beloved noodle dishes and inspire you to try cooking them at home.

FAQs

Are Chow Mein and Lo Mein vegan?

Chow Mein and Lo Mein can be made vegan by using vegetable broth and replacing the meat with tofu or a variety of vegetables.

Can I use gluten-free noodles?

Yes, you can substitute regular wheat or egg noodles with gluten-free alternatives.

What can I serve with Chow Mein or Lo Mein?

These noodle dishes can be served with a variety of sides such as spring rolls, dumplings, or a simple vegetable stir-fry.

In the end, whether you choose Chow Mein or Lo Mein, you’re in for a delicious meal full of flavor and texture. Enjoy!

Chow Mein vs Lo Mein

5 from 2 votes
Recipe by Laura Ritterman

Ingredients

  • chow mein

  • lo mein

Directions

  • Choose which dish you want to make out of lo mein vs chow mein
  • Gather the ingredients
  • Serve and enjoy

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